• go to Dana S Scott's profile page
  • go to John L Hennessy's profile page
  • go to Geoffrey E Hinton's profile page
  • go to J. H. Wilkinson 's profile page
  • go to Leslie Lamport's profile page
  • go to Kristen Nygaard 's profile page
  • go to Leonard M. Adleman's profile page
  • go to Alan Kay's profile page
  • go to Robert E Kahn's profile page
  • go to Butler W Lampson's profile page
  • go to C. Antony R. Hoare 's profile page
  • go to John E Hopcroft's profile page
  • go to Douglas Engelbart's profile page
  • go to Vinton Cerf's profile page
  • go to Sir Tim Berners-Lee's profile page
  • go to John Cocke 's profile page
  • go to Frances Allen's profile page
  • go to Peter Naur's profile page
  • go to Jim Gray 's profile page
  • go to Edgar F. Codd's profile page
  • go to Juris Hartmanis's profile page
  • go to Silvio Micali's profile page
  • go to William Kahan's profile page
  • go to Allen Newell 's profile page
A.M. TURING AWARD WINNERS BY...

FATHERS OF THE DEEP LEARNING REVOLUTION RECEIVE ACM A.M. TURING AWARD 

Bengio, Hinton, and LeCun Ushered in Major Breakthroughs in Artificial Intelligence 


The A.M. Turing Award, the ACM's most prestigious technical award, is given for major contributions of lasting importance to computing.

This site celebrates all the winners since the award's creation in 1966. It contains biographical information, a description of their accomplishments, straightforward explanations of their fields of specialization, and text or video of their A. M. Turing Award Lecture.

A.M TURING

The A.M. Turing Award, sometimes referred to as the "Nobel Prize of Computing," was named in honor of Alan Mathison Turing (1912–1954), a British mathematician and computer scientist. He made fundamental advances in computer architecture, algorithms, formalization of computing, and artificial intelligence. Turing was also instrumental in British code-breaking work during World War II.