A.M. TURING AWARD WINNERS BY...

Leslie Lamport Receives 2013 ACM Turing Award For Advances In Reliability and Consistency of Computing Systems

Leslie Lamport, a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, has been named as the recipient of the 2013 ACM A.M. Turing Award for imposing clear, well-defined coherence on the seemingly chaotic behavior of distributed computing systems, in which several autonomous computers communicate with each other by passing messages. He devised important algorithms and developed formal modeling and verification protocols that improve the quality of real distributed systems. These contributions have resulted in improved correctness, performance, and reliability of computer systems.

View a video by Microsoft Research on Leslie Lamport's work and read his 1978 paper, "Time, Clocks, and the Ordering of Events in a Distributed System," one of the most cited in the history of computer science.

ACM will present the 2013 A.M. Turing Award at its annual Awards Banquet on June 21 in San Francisco, CA.


Watch a brief video about the 2012 ACM Turing Award Laureates Shafi Goldwasser and Silvio Micali


Douglas Engelbart, 1997 ACM Turing Award Laureate, Dies

ACM A.M. Turing Award laureate and computing pioneer Douglas Engelbart, who is credited with inventing the computer mouse, died July 2, 2013 at his home in Atherton, California. He was 88.


The A.M. Turing Award, the ACM's most prestigious technical award, is given for major contributions of lasting importance to computing. Recipients are invited to give the annual A.M. Turing Award Lecture. The award is also accompanied by a cash prize of $250,000, which in recent years has been underwritten by the Intel Corporation and Google, Inc.

This site celebrates all the winners since the award's creation in 1966. It contains biographical information, a description of their accomplishments, straightforward explanations of their fields of specialization, and text or video of their A. M. Turing Award Lecture.

A.M TURING

The A.M. Turing Award, sometimes referred to as the "Nobel Prize" of Computing, was named in honor of Alan Mathison Turing (1912–1954), a British mathematician and computer scientist. He made fundamental advances in computer architecture, algorithms, formalization of computing, and artificial intelligence. Turing was also instrumental in British code-breaking work during World War II.